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Table 1 Clinical and laboratory characteristics of infants without and with laboratory features consistent with the diagnosis of transient pseudo-hypoaldosteronism. Data are presented as frequency or as median and interquartile range

From: Pseudo-hypoaldosteronism secondary to infantile urinary tract infections: role of ultrasound

  Pseudo-hypoaldosteronism  
Without With P-value
N 54 17  
Demographics
 Males: Females 31: 23 11: 6 0.76
 Age, months 4.8 [2.2–11] 4.0 [3.3–7.3] 0.93
Blood values
 Hemoglobin, g/L 113 [106–122] 114 [104–122] 0.56
 Leukocyte count, 109/L 14.4 [11.6–19.9] 14.6 [11.5–19.8] 0.76
 Platelet count, 109/L 415 [319–470] 416 [322–469] 0.48
 C-reactive protein, mg/L 30 [11–90] 35 [15–60] 0.42
 Sodium, mmol/L 134 [133–136] 131 [129–133]
 Potassium mmol/L 4.7 [4.3–4.9] 5.5 [4.7–6.0]
 Bicarbonate, mmol/L 24 [22–26] 19 [18–21]
 Creatinine, μmol/L 27 [20–33] 28 [25–31] 0.53
 Urea, mmol/L 2.8 [2.2–3.5] 2.4 [2.2–3.7] 0.33
Altered kidney-urinary tract ultrasound 7* 4 0.44
  1. the two study groups were not compared with respect to these parameters, because a statistically significant difference is predictable; * UTD classification stage 2: N = 1; stage 3: N = 6; UTD classification stage 2: N = 1; stage 3: N = 3